Mathew B. Sims is Editor-in-Chief and has authored, edited, and contributed to several books. He has been working in the insurance industry ensuring content is accurate for consumers who are searching for the best policies and rates. He has also been featured on sites like UpJourney.

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Dan Walker graduated with a BS in Administrative Management in 2005 and has been working in his family’s insurance agency, FCI Agency, for 15 years (BBB A+). He is licensed as an agent to write property and casualty insurance, including home, auto, umbrella, and dwelling fire insurance. He’s also been featured on sites like Reviews.com and Safeco. He reviews content, ensuring that exis...

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Reviewed by Daniel Walker
Licensed Auto Insurance Agent

UPDATED: Apr 23, 2020

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Things to Remember...

  • If you have the right kind of auto insurance, collision or comprehensive, then your provider will pay for a cracked rim
  • A new rim can cost anywhere from $250 to $1000, depending on the type of car you own and the type of wheels you have on the car
  • If you can afford it, consider simply paying for the entire thing out of pocket and avoid having your rates increase because of this claim

If you have the right kind of auto insurance, then your provider will pay for a cracked rim. When we say the right kind of insurance, we mean collision or comprehensive insurance, depending on what caused the crack in the rim.

When you enter your zip code below, you are taking the first step to comparing auto insurance quotes from multiple companies all in one place!

Collision insurance will cover the cost of any repairs needed on your vehicle as the result of a collision. This type of collision can be with another vehicle or it can be with an object, such as a tree or even a pothole.

If your rim is cracked in one of these situations, your collision coverage will protect you.

Comprehensive insurance covers damage to your vehicle due to theft, vandalism, acts of nature or accidents that happen to your car when it is not being driven. If you get a cracked rim during any of these events, then it is your comprehensive coverage that will pay for it.

Should I have my auto insurance pay for a cracked rim?

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This is a really important question. A new rim can cost anywhere from $250 to $1000, depending on the type of car you own and the type of wheels you have on the car. Most people have a deductible of at least $500 on their insurance, so it may not be worth it to file a claim.

Many people don’t realize that even if the insurance company doesn’t pay out on a claim that you file because your deductible was too high, you may still see an increase in rates because you filed a claim in the first place.

This is something that you need to consider before making the decision to file a claim for a cracked rim.

Even if your deductible doesn’t cover the total cost of the rims and the auto insurance company can cut you a check, this doesn’t mean that you should file a claim.

If you can afford it, consider simply paying for the entire thing out of pocket and avoid having your rates increase because of this claim.

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Enter your ZIP code below to view companies that have cheap auto insurance rates.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Will my insurance pay for my cracked rim to be repaired?

In all likelihood, the chances of this happening are low. The reason is that there are mixed thoughts as to whether it is safe for you to repair a cracked rim and then drive on it again.

Many experts agree that this will comprise the integrity of the rims and create a potentially more dangerous situation should you drive over a pothole, hit a curb or even drive on a particularly bumpy road.

Because of this, most insurance companies will not pay for the cost of repairing a rim. They would rather you replace it and not risk compromising the strength of the rim.

If you repair it on your own, after reporting a crack on the rim and the rim fails while driving, the insurance company can refuse to cover the cost of those damages because you are not keeping your car in a good running condition.

How will making a claim for my rims affect my insurance rates?

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While you may see an increase in your rates, the increase will probably be fairly low. The exception being if you have many small claims like this one filed against your policy.

If that is the case, then you can expect to see a much larger increase, not as much as you would if you had a serious car accident, but it could be as much as $20 more a month, which for many people equates to too much.

The truth is that most people may only see an increase of $1 to $2 a month for making a claim for a rim; however, what you have to consider is the possibility of filing a claim for more at a later date.

Some insurance companies will raise your rates because you have the tendency to file claims whenever you have an issue with your car like this one. Even if the company is only writing small checks for those claims, they will still consider you to be a higher risk driver and someone prone to minor accidents.

This is why it is best to consider this before making a claim. It may be to your benefit to simply pay for the replacement of your rim for yourself rather than risk paying higher rates.

If you have a long history with no claims, then don’t worry too much about it. However, if you have filed several small claims in recent years, then consider the alternative so you won’t pay larger fees.

Enter your zip code below to compare auto insurance quotes from multiple companies!